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Castor Oil & its benefits

ZaShandu
ZaShandu
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Castor oil may not be the tastiest oil in the world, as anyone who has had to drink it will confirm. Despite its unpleasant taste, benefits of castor oil are very numerous, and you can use it not only for your beauty and health, but also for the house as well.

1. Lubricant
Castor oil makes a great lubricant for metal devices, such as scissors, any cooking metal devices and, why not, door hinges. The reason it’s the best one you can use for kitchen utensils is that it’s an edible oil unlike the ones that are specifically made for lubrication. All you need to do is oil the scissors, let the oil stay for a while, then wipe it with a paper towel.

2. Painkiller
Castor oil contains ricinoleic acid, which has strong pain-relieving properties. These make the oil suitable for the treatment of any chronic or acute pains, as well as for wounds and burns, because in addition to pain-relieving properties, the ricinoleic acid is also a mighty antimicrobial agent.

3. Immune stimulant
Some naturo paths claim that castor oil has a tangible effect on the function of the immune system. It increases the white blood cell count, as well as the number of other types of blood cells, they say. Although these claims have not yet been proven experimentally, they sure sound good. Doctors use castor oil in clinical medicine to deliver chemotherapy drugs to the tumors of their patients.


4. Hair growth agent
Another one of popular uses of castor oil is for hair growth. Castor oil is an ingredient in many hair care products but it can also be used on its own to promote hair growth and health. The way it does it is the same way other natural oils work: by improving the blood circulation on the scalp, promoting the health of the hair follicles as they get more nutrients and the hairs grow stronger.

5. Hair dye
Benefits and uses of castor oil for hair are very numerous. Besides promoting healthy growth, castor oil can be used as a nourishing and darkening agent, if you want your hair to acquire a darker hue. The way to do this is by adding half a teaspoon of oil to your styling mousse or your stay-in conditioner and let it work its magic. Don’t expect to go from blonde to chestnut but you’ll get a richer, slightly darker color.

6. Scar treatment
Interestingly enough, castor oil has been said to promote healthy skin and erase scars. One thing to bear in mind here is that, like most natural remedies, it works slowly but it does work, thanks to the fatty acids it contains, which penetrate deep into the lower layers of the skin and promotes the growth of healthy skin cells around the damaged ones that make up the scar.

7. Weight loss
Another one of popular uses of castor oil is for weight loss. Taken internally, castor oil helps the body flush out waste and toxins by stimulating the work of the digestive tract. Its use as a laxative is perhaps best known, but it can also dissolve fatty tissue, when used externally, as massage oil. Internally, it also helps counter water retention, a contributing factor to weight gain.

8. Stronger brows and lashes
Uses of castor oil for beauty are very numerous and here is another one of them: castor oil has a beneficial effect on all hair on your body. In addition to making your hair stronger, it can make your eyebrows and lashes less breakable and thicker. Once again, don’t forget that oils work slowly, so you will have to be persistent. Just rub some into your brows and lashes at night, before you go to bed.

9. Nails
Nails are made from the same material as hair – keratin. So, what’s good for your hair will also be good for your nails. This totally applies for castor oil. Rubbing some into your cuticles and nails on a daily basis will in a few months give you stronger, more beautiful nails, less prone to breaking and splitting.

10. Mole repellent
In addition to all these health benefits, castor oil makes a great non-violent repellent for moles, in case you have a garden and you love it. You simply need to mix half a cup of castor oil with a bucket of water, and pour it down molehills. Apparently, moles hate the smell of the oil, so they’ll leave your flowers and carrots alone.

Learning new things every day ;)

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mia shaik
mia shaik
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Wednesday, June 03 2015, 04:00 PM - #Permalink
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Thanks for sharing doll
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  • Accepted Answer

    mia shaik
    mia shaik
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    Wednesday, June 03 2015, 04:00 PM - #Permalink
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    I need to some more hair on my brows so going to get on it :p
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    Tends
    Tends
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    Wednesday, June 03 2015, 05:51 PM - #Permalink
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    Interesting read. I'm also told if you apply castor oil at least 4 times a week, it will do wonders for stretchmarks. Haven't tried it yet though.

    I'm interested to know how it works as a pain killer, do you rub it on the painful area or ingest it?
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    ZaShandu
    ZaShandu
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    Thursday, June 04 2015, 08:45 AM - #Permalink
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    Hi Tends

    Yes you rub it in that affected area and massage;)
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